LaFleur

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by InvaderRam InvaderRam 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #65339
    zn
    zn
    Moderator

    Matt LaFleur, new Rams offensive coordinator, will try to get run and pass games working together

    Gary Klein

    http://www.latimes.com/sports/rams/la-sp-rams-matt-lafleur-20170216-story.html

    The feeling won’t go away. Matt LaFleur, the Rams’ new offensive coordinator, suspects it never will completely.

    As quarterbacks coach for the Atlanta Falcons, he recently experienced an epic Super Bowl defeat to the New England Patriots.

    And the aftermath.

    “I was grieving for a couple days, there’s no doubt about it,” LaFleur said Thursday when asked whether he has been able to move past the loss, “but if you live in the past you’re not going to go anywhere with your future.”

    LaFleur began looking ahead this week when he arrived in Thousand Oaks to join new Coach Sean McVay’s staff.

    Much like McVay, at 31 the youngest coach in modern NFL history, the 37-year-old LaFleur is a young but experienced coach who appears even more youthful than his age.

    After coaching quarterbacks for the Falcons, Washington Redskins and Notre Dame, this will be LaFleur’s first opportunity as an NFL coordinator.

    McVay said last week that he developed “a really close relationship” with LaFleur during their years working together in Washington.

    “Detail oriented, good communicator, been around some of the most productive offenses over the last couple of years,” McVay said. “You look at what Atlanta was able to do. A lot of the things that we do philosophically will be very similar.”

    McVay, the Redskins offensive coordinator and play-caller the last three seasons, will call plays this season as the Rams attempt to rebound from a 4-12 finish and try to qualify for the playoffs for the first time since 2004.

    During an interview with a small group of reporters at the Rams’ training facility, LaFleur said he would “help organize and kind of like set the table” for McVay.

    “If he feels comfortable with me doing it, eventually, then maybe we’ll go that route,” LaFleur said of calling plays. “We gotta lay the foundation first.”

    LaFleur, along with McVay and quarterbacks coach Greg Olson, will be part of a triumvirate focused on developing quarterback Jared Goff, the No. 1 pick in last year’s draft.

    LaFleur worked the last two years in Atlanta with nine-year veteran Matt Ryan, this season’s NFL most valuable player. His focus turns to getting the most out of Goff, a second-year pro the Rams traded six draft picks to move up and select last April.

    LaFleur got a close-up look at Goff during the 2016 NFL scouting combine.

    “He was pretty impressive,” LaFleur said.

    In December, LaFleur was focused on the Rams’ defense before and during the Falcons’ 42-14 rout at the Coliseum in what proved to be Jeff Fisher’s final game as Rams coach. In his fourth start, Goff completed 24 of 41 passes for 235 yards, with two interceptions.

    LaFleur has begun to intensely evaluate Goff, who passed for five touchdowns, with seven interceptions, in seven winless starts.

    “From what I’ve seen on tape, he’s got some of the key attributes that you always look for in a quarterback. He’s a natural thrower,” LaFleur said. “You have to be able to hang in there in some uncomfortable pockets and some uncomfortable situations where you’re going to take a hit and deliver the football. He’s proven that he’ll do that.”

    LaFleur said Goff was “experimenting” this off-season with quarterback trainers Tom House and Adam Dedeaux, who have aided Ryan, Tom Brady and others with their mechanics and conditioning.

    “I was happy to hear it because I have seen the benefits,” LaFleur said. “What those guys do is pretty valuable, and it’s not always obviously [possible] with the time constraints that we can work with these guys.”

    Along with assessing Goff, LaFleur is evaluating other offensive personnel as the Rams prepare for the start of free agency and the draft. He and fellow coaches must find ways to improve an offense that ranked as the NFL’s worst the last two seasons.

    The new system is expected to include many of the elements that drove the Falcons’ and Redskins’ high-powered attacks in recent seasons.

    “It truly will be a system that is going to marry the run with the pass,” LaFleur said.

    Last season the Rams’ offensive line failed to spring running back Todd Gurley, the NFL’s offensive rookie of the year in 2015.

    “First and foremost, you’ve got to be committed to it,” LaFleur said of the running game. “And you’ve got to have a system in place that you believe in. And I think if you can get that running game going, everything plays off each other.

    “If you get your running game going, your passing game is going to be better.”

    The Rams have not had a winning season since 2003. They appear a long way from a Super Bowl appearance.

    LaFleur is excited about moving forward from his Super Bowl experience.

    “As bad as it hurt to lose that game I definitely want to get back there, win, lose or draw,” he said. “Hopefully next time we’re back there, it’s a lot better feeling.”

    #65340
    zn
    zn
    Moderator

    LaFleur’s aim is to turn lowly Rams into high-flying Falcons

    http://www.foxsports.com/nfl/story/lafleur-s-aim-is-to-turn-lowly-rams-into-high-flying-falcons-021617?cmpid=feed:-sports-CQ-RSS-Feed

    THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) As Matt LaFleur was helping the Atlanta Falcons prepare to play New England in the Super Bowl, he took special interest in one particular game, a 26-10 victory by the Patriots over the Los Angeles Rams.

    LaFleur knew he would be joining new Rams head coach Sean McVay’s staff as offensive coordinator and ”paid a little more attention to that game,” the 37-year old said Thursday.

    What that film showed is the scope of the challenge awaiting LaFleur, McVay and quarterbacks coach Greg Olson in overhauling the worst offense in the NFL last season. Quarterback Jared Goff made his third career start against the Patriots, throwing one of the five touchdown passes during his erratic rookie season. Running back Todd Gurley rushed for just 38 yards, and the Rams finished with 162 yards.

    It was a stark contrast from the Falcons’ prolific offense, which led the league in points per game and yards per play in LaFleur’s second season as quarterbacks coach. However, LaFleur won’t make firmer judgements based on tape alone.

    ”I don’t think you really truly know until you start to work with these guys,” LaFleur said. ”We have a system that we’re going to put in place. Sean and I worked together in Washington. I think philosophically, our views are very, very similar. But I think at the end of the day, you have to be able to adapt to the players that you have and put them in the best position to be successful.”

    LaFleur was quick to credit the Falcons’ improvement to greater familiarity with the scheme, personnel upgrades and hard work put in by the players during the previous offseason.

    Goff is already doing his part to improve, working with pitching guru Tom House. Goff made the decision to work with House on his own, but LaFleur endorses it, having seen first-hand the impact House had on Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan.

    ”They offer some things that maybe we can’t as coaches from just a strength and conditioning standpoint in terms of how these guys train and keep their core strong, keep their shoulders strong,” LaFleur said. ”You’re talking about a long season for these quarterbacks. I didn’t see Matt Ryan fall off from Day 1 to the Super Bowl, his arm strength was as good as it was at the beginning of the season.”

    Goff should also benefit from the tutoring of LaFleur, McVay and Olson. While it is still to be determined how much LaFleur will work with Goff on a daily basis, LaFleur believes the similar philosophy and approach shared by all three coaches will prevent conflicting messages from overloading 2016’s No. 1 overall draft pick.

    ”When you see it the same as the other guys it makes for a much easier transition,” LaFleur said.

    The immediate challenge for LaFleur is assessing the talent level on the current Rams’ roster and preparing for the draft and free agency, understanding exactly how a supporting cast contributes to the success or failure of a quarterback. As a college quarterback at Saginaw Valley State, LaFleur was throwing to two future NFL receivers, joking that ”it didn’t matter if I threw a good ball or a bad ball, odds are they were going to make me look good.” The Falcons benefitted from the signings of center Alex Mack and wide receiver Mohamed Sanu, upgrading an offense that thrived on balance.

    Goff’s struggles were compounded by Gurley’s sophomore slump, rushing for 221 fewer yards and four fewer touchdowns despite playing in four more games than his rookie season. LaFleur and McVay understand the importance of a strong running game from their time together in Washington, especially in helping a young quarterback get comfortable.

    ”It just alleviates pressure on everybody, from the offensive line to the quarterback,” LaFleur said.

    #65341
    zn
    zn
    Moderator

    Matt LaFleur looking forward to facing some familiar foes

    RICH HAMMOND

    http://www.ocregister.com/articles/lafleur-744290-coach-rams.html

    The old Rams-49ers rivalry, damp in 2016 when both teams were awful, might be reignited, at least in the coaches’ offices. Now it’s LaFleur vs. Shanahan, and La Fleur vs. LaFleur.

    Matt LaFleur, the Rams’ new offensive coordinator, will coach at least two games next season against two of his former colleagues from Atlanta: new 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan and LaFleur’s younger brother Mike, hired this month by Shanahan as the 49ers’ receivers coach.

    “It’s definitely going to be a transition,” Matt LaFleur told reporters Thursday, then joked, “We’re going to have to have a LaFleur family trophy that gets presented after our games. It’s going to be different, there’s no doubt about it. Those are some of my best friends. I love those guys, but not on game day, I can promise you that. There’s going to be some extra incentive to take it to them.”

    The Rams would like to stay ahead of the 49ers in the NFC West standings, but they hope LaFleur can bring much more, and perhaps bring a little of the Matt Ryan magic to this coast.

    LaFleur worked with Ryan, this year’s NFL MVP, for the past two seasons as the Falcons’ quarterbacks coach. LaFleur, who has never been a coordinator at the NFL or major-college level, won’t call plays for the Rams. Coach Sean McVay, who hired LaFleur this month, will retain those duties, but LaFleur will work as something of an offensive CEO and as part of the team that (hopefully) will develop Jared Goff.

    LaFleur said it’s possible that McVay, who at 31 is the youngest head coach in the NFL, might hand over play-calling duties to LaFleur, 37, but LaFleur said he has plenty of work for now.

    “We have a system that we’re going to put in place,” LaFleur said. “Sean and I worked together in Washington and I think, philosophically, our views are very similar, but at the end of the day, you have to be able to adapt to the players you have and put them in the best position to be successful.”

    LaFleur was Washington’s first-year quarterbacks coach in 2010 when McVay, then 24, landed a job on the staff as a low-level assistant. LaFleur knew it wouldn’t take long for McVay to rise.

    “I thought, ‘This guy is going to be a head coach someday’” LaFleur said of McVay. “It’s no surprise to me, how fast it’s happened, because he has a lot of the traits you look for in a leader. Number one, he’s got so much energy. He’s very knowledgeable. He’s got the work ethic.”

    McVay identified LaFleur as his top offensive deputy, but had to wait three weeks to make the hire official because LaFleur and the Falcons advanced to the Super Bowl, where they suffered a devastating loss to New England.

    LaFleur said he took a couple days to decompress with his family, then started work with the Rams on Monday. And while LaFleur talked about the importance of a balanced offense, it’s clear that the focus will be on improving Goff, who had uneven results in seven games as a rookie starter last season.

    The Rams hope McVay, LaFleur and quarterbacks coach Greg Olson will form a strong trio of coaches to support Goff, but they’re not alone.

    In the six weeks since the Rams’ season ended, Goff has started working with Tom House, the USC product, former pro pitcher and former pitching coach who has transitioned in recent years to work with NFL quarterbacks.

    House works alongside Adam Dedeaux, grandson of legendary USC baseball coach Rod Dedeaux. LaFleur praised their work with Ryan last year and expressed excitement about working with Goff.

    “From what I’ve seen on tape, he’s got some of the key attributes that you always look for in a quarterback,” LaFleur said. “He’s a natural thrower. You never want to see your quarterback getting hit too much, but he doesn’t shy away from contact. That’s true of any good quarterback in this league.

    “You’ve got to be able to hang in there in some uncomfortable pockets and uncomfortable situations, where you’re going to take a hit and deliver the football. I think he’s proven he will do that, on tape. That said, we want his jersey clean at the end of the game.”

    #65363
    zn
    zn
    Moderator

    LaFleur Brings QB Expertise to Offensive Coordinator

    By Myles Simmons

    http://www.therams.com/news-and-events/article-1/LaFleur-Brings-QB-Expertise-to-Offensive-Coordinator/64dbad4a-baea-4756-a869-782facb07345

    It’s been a whirlwind few weeks for Los Angeles’ new offensive coordinator, Matt LaFleur. From coaching Atlanta’s quarterbacks in Super Bowl LI to now studying film in his Thousand Oaks office, LaFleur is getting up to speed on everything Rams.

    “There’s so much evaluation that needs to [go on], especially for myself — I know there’s other guys who have a better feel for our roster than I do right now, to be honest with you, but there’s a ton of evaluation that’s taking place as we speak,” LaFleur said Thursday, having arrived in Southern California at the beginning of the week. “I think I’ll have a better feel a week or two from now.”

    LaFleur and head coach Sean McVay know each other well from their shared time in Washington from 2010-2013, when they worked under Mike and Kyle Shanahan. But that friendship is a significant part of why LaFleur elected to depart the Falcons.

    “We’ve developed a pretty strong relationship. I think there’s a mutual respect for our coaching abilities,” LaFleur said. “It was just one of those deals where I was fortunate enough to work for a great organization and Dan Quinn, he allowed me the opportunity to further my career as well.”

    “He’s a guy that able to develop a really close relationship with in Washington,” McVay said last week. “Detail oriented, good communicator, been around some of the most productive offenses over the last couple of years. You look at what Atlanta was able to do. A lot of the things that we do philosophically will be very similar.”

    McVay and LaFleur’s shared experiences should help both in coming up with a playbook for Los Angeles’ offense. But that does necessarily mean the process will be easy.

    “There’s going to be a ton of work,” LaFleur said. “As coaches, you always feel like you’re behind the eight ball. I’m confident that we’re going to carve out enough time and have a very detailed, thorough plan that’s well thought together.

    “It truly will be a system that is going to marry the run with the pass,” LaFleur continued. “I know we both believe in that, and the benefits that it gives, really, not only the quarterback, but all the players on our team.”

    At this point in the offseason, McVay has already stated he plans on calling the Rams’ offensive plays, so that is one duty LaFleur will not have as offensive coordinator. LaFleur envisions his job as making sure the offense stays up to task during the season.

    “A big thing that I’m going to have to do is try to help organize and kind of like set the table for Sean, because he’s not always going to be able to be with us,” LaFleur said. “There’s many more obligations and duties as a head coach. Just make sure that the rest of the staff, we’re all on the same page, kind of lay the table for him.”

    He also expects to be spending plenty of time in the quarterbacks room, given that it’s his area of expertise. LaFleur’s spent six years as a QBs coach in the NFL.

    “We haven’t really totally discussed all of the responsibilities but I would think I that I’ll be heavily involved in dealing with the quarterbacks,” LaFleur said. “It was the same way when I was with Kyle in Washington and in Atlanta. He was heavily involved. Because you want to know what the, and I think Sean will be, too. You want to know what the play-callers are thinking. It’s only going to help the quarterback.”

    With McVay, LaFleur, and quarterbacks coach Greg Olson all experienced in bringing up signal-callers, there will be plenty of coaching available for 2016 No. 1 overall pick Jared Goff. And those three voices don’t expect an issue when it comes to conveying one consistent message in teaching the system.

    “I don’t think so because got a lot of respect for ‘Oly,’” LaFleur said. “Obviously, he’s been a coordinator for a long time, quarterback coach. We’ve had a lot of discussions and I think we all see the position the same way. So when you see it the same as the other guys it makes for a much easier transition.”

    “That’s why it’s very important to have Matt and Greg in place where if you’re not able to be a part of the offensive meetings, or whatever is going on, you trust that their leadership will continue to have that same messaging, so that our quarterbacks know exactly what the expectations are,” McVay said. “I don’t think you can have enough good coaches in the building.”

    As for Goff, LaFleur said he’s looking forward to working with the second-year QB. LaFleur relayed he studied Goff during the 2016 pre-draft process, and now has been taking a close look at his Rams game film.

    “From what I’ve seen on tape, he’s got some of the key attributes that you always look for in a quarterback. He’s a natural thrower,” LaFleur said. “You never want to see your quarterback getting hit too much, but he doesn’t shy from contact. I think that’s true of any good quarterback in this league. You have to be able to hang in there in some uncomfortable pockets and some uncomfortable situations where you’re going to take a hit and deliver the football. He’s proven that he’ll do that on tape.”

    LaFleur anticipates his experience with coaching quarterbacks — like 2016 NFL MVP Matt Ryan in Atlanta — should aid his ability to help develop Goff.

    “I was in Washington when we drafted Robert Griffin and Kurt Cousins, so, to help them through, we worked together with those guys for two guys,” LaFleur said. “It’s going to help me in this situation dealing with a second-year player.”

    “I think I’ve grown a ton from the time I was working with those guys, then you do work with a veteran like Matt Ryan and you have a Matt Schaub in the room, who is a veteran quarterback that’s played at a really high-level himself and you just take everything you learn from all those situations,” he continued. “I think it’s only going to help me dealing with a second-year quarterback that really, truly, has rookie-like experience.”

    And so LaFleur enters his new job as one of many tasked to help turn around the Rams’ offense. But what will it take to make L.A. a consistent performer?

    “I don’t think you really truly know until you start to work with these guys. We have a system that we’re going to put in place,” LaFleur said. “But I think at the end of the day, you have to be able to adapt to the players that you have and put them in the best position to be successful.”

    #65404
    InvaderRam
    InvaderRam
    Moderator

    i’ve said this before, but i know lafleur must have gotten plenty of exposure to the shanahan passing game, but i wonder how much of the zbs he was able to absorb during his time with mike. which was a long time.

    if they could marry elements of that running game with anything kromer might have absorbed with his time under that greg roman offense (quite possibly the 2 most potent running games in the league last year). well that would be something.

    and not only that but shanny’s ability to marry the running game with the passing game so effectively. i hope lafleur can bring that to the table as well.

    #65735
    zn
    zn
    Moderator

    Kyle Shanahan thinks new Rams OC Matt LaFleur is ready to call plays

    Alden Gonzalez

    http://www.espn.com/blog/los-angeles-rams/post/_/id/33139/kyle-shanahan-thinks-new-rams-oc-matt-lafleur-is-ready-to-call-plays

    INDIANAPOLIS — Sean McVay will call the offensive plays in his first season as the Los Angeles Rams’ head coach, but eventually that task will probably fall on Matt LaFleur, the former Atlanta Falcons quarterbacks coach who was brought in as the new offensive coordinator. Kyle Shanahan, the former Falcons offensive coordinator who is now head coach of the division-rival San Francisco 49ers, was asked if LaFleur is ready for something like that.

    “Yeah,” Shanahan said, “he’s been ready for a while.”

    As quarterbacks coach, LaFleur helped make Robert Griffin III the Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2012 and Matt Ryan the MVP in 2016. He was with the Redskins from 2010 to ’13, while McVay coached tight ends and Shanahan ran the offense. LaFleur went on to coach quarterback Everett Golson at Notre Dame in 2014, then reunited with Shanahan in Atlanta, a stint that ended with a bitter Super Bowl loss.

    After Shanahan took the job with the 49ers, LaFleur was free to become the Rams’ offensive coordinator, a role in which LaFleur said he’ll “organize and kind of set the table for Sean.”

    Falcons coach Dan Quinn, who could’ve blocked LaFleur from leaving, said he spoke to LaFleur about becoming his new offensive coordinator because of how well he worked with Ryan. Quinn instead opted to go with Steve Sarkisian, largely because he wanted someone with playcalling experience. But Quinn raved about LaFleur, calling him “a really, really detailed teacher” and “the ideal person” to pair with a young quarterback like Jared Goff.

    “They’re getting a hell of a coach,” Shanahan, speaking from the scouting combine Wednesday, said of LaFleur. “… Matt understands the game. He played college quarterback. He knows a lot about that position. He knows the run game, he knows the pass game, he knows how to tie them together.”

    #65757
    InvaderRam
    InvaderRam
    Moderator

    “Yeah,” Shanahan said, “he’s been ready for a while.”

    yeah. my suspicion is that it’ll be similar to what mcvay went through with gruden. once the system is installed and mcvay wants to sit back and look at the bigger picture he’ll hand over playcalling duties to lafleur as long as he’s comfortable with it. probably not this season but maybe next season.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed.